Volunteers: The Keystone to Stewardship

Satisfaction. Discovery. Commitment. Giving back.  Protecting the Lake.  These were common answers when we asked our volunteers why they help.

Dianne Leary thinks back to childhood summers spent lying on her grandparent’s dock with a diving mask watching fish. Observing the hidden underwater world, Dianne gained a deep appreciation for Lake Champlain and is driven to protect it. Asked why she volunteers, Dianne states simply, “If you want change to happen, you have to talk the talk and walk the walk.”

For Thomas and Cathy Shearer, whose family adopted the Round Pond trail, it’s about connecting their children to nature.

“It became one of our kids’ primary gateways to the natural world. They would go exploring and find caterpillars, berries, mushrooms, butterflies, snakes, and a ton of other cool things they wouldn’t find in our backyard.”

A strong desire to take action inspires Gunnar Sievert, who joins our workdays because they generate concrete results.  Our hard-charging volunteers get their hands dirty and witness the results of their digging, pruning, and raking—restored forests, more stable riverbanks, and improved trails.

With your help, we are caring for the Lake and the Land—to create a new and improved conservation ethic in the Champlain Valley.

Do you or your family want to adopt a trail near you, or are you interested in joining our volunteer email list to learn about upcoming project needs? Give us a call (802) 862-4150 or email .

Caring for Our Land

Volunteer Spotlight: Baird Morgan

Baird Morgan looking over Lake Champlain from Hoyt Overlook

Baird Morgan looking over Lake Champlain from Hoyt Overlook

Baird Morgan has a clear view of Eagle Mountain from his Grand Isle camp and was one of the many volunteers who answered our request to adopt one of our trails. He, along with many Adopt-A-Trail volunteers, have been visiting “their” trail a couple of times a month to both enjoy the views and to make sure that the trails are clear of tree branches and litter.

After adding fresh blazes from the new parking area, and recruiting fellow hikers like his wife, and even a stranger he met on the trail, Baird worked with the Lake Champlain Land Trust to come up with new trail signs. Baird even successfully convinced the publisher of the local Milton Independent to write a story to help recruit other volunteers.  (Suzanne Flynn, the owner of the Milton Independent and several local newspapers generously paid for the new signs.)

“As a busy land trust, we rely on people like Baird to help us take care of these special community places,” noted Chris Boget,  Executive Director of the Lake Champlain Land Trust. “I am grateful for how far he went to make sure the trail improvements made it easier for everyone to enjoy Eagle Mountain.”

Working with Baird, the Lake Champlain Land Trust can bring in additional volunteers if there is ever the need for substantial clean-up or removal of blown-down trees. A special thank you to Baird for all of his help and being one of the official “eyes on the ground” team members of the Lake Champlain Land Trust.

You know, I really enjoy it. I love being outside in different seasons and I appreciate knowing that I can help out in my own small way. It doesn’t take a ton of time, it’s not hard and it’s fun.”  -Baird Morgan, Volunteer

 

Do you or your family want to adopt a trail near you, or are you interested in joining our volunteer email list to learn about upcoming project needs? Give us a call (802) 862-4150 or email jeff@lclt.org.

Volunteer’s Perspective

 Niquette Bay State Park photo courtesy of Lake Champlain Land Trust

Delighted you have done so many interesting hikes for all ages and families… Thank you for what you do.

– Susan Alden

Volunteer’s Perspective

Shearers at Round Pond

Spending time outside with my two sons, exploring nature while also giving back…I looked forward to it every summer.

-Thomas Shearer has adopted Round Pond Natural Area for the past 5 years.