Lake Champlain Photos – Jeff O’Donnell

An early summer sun sets over Burlington’s North Beach

Lake Champlain Photos – Chris Boget

Burlington Waterfront in full bloom

Caring For One of Vermont’s Rarest Habitats

When the Community Takes Action, Great Things Happen

After the Ice Age, large fan-shaped deposits of sand, sometimes up to 40 feet deep, were left in areas like Colchester, Vermont, now home to the Pitch Pine Sandplain Forest. Originally perhaps Sandplain-photo--Howard-Oct09--CJB-(45) 5,000 acres in size, the Sandplain Forests were home to a very special mix of plants.

This unique collection of plants was dominated by the fire-resistant Pitch Pine tree—a tree that required occasional fires to combat the vigorous growth of other trees that would overshadow it. Lightning-sparked fires helped give the Pitch Pine, and the other plants and animals that rely on it, the ability to flourish.

Unfortunately the flat, fast-draining Sandplain areas were also places where people could easily build. As a result, very little of the original Sandplain Forests remain, with only an estimated 500 acres surviving in small pockets surrounded by development.

A number of landowners and community members are stepping up to help save these rare landscapes.

Action Is the Only Solution

Dr. Phil Howard is one of the landowners stepping up. Dr. Howard spent his career as a research scientist at the University of Vermont. He understood the unique nature of his Sandplain Forest. Standing by, watching the land lose the essence of what he loved, was not an option. So he took action.

Five years ago, Dr. Howard conserved all of his land (excluding his house site), establishing his land as the largest protected Sandplain Forest in Vermont. While he still owns the land, he has diligently worked with the Lake Champlain Land Trust and our teams of interns and volunteers to begin to manage it in a way that will help it return to its ecologically important role.

Now, thanks to the generous funders of our Ecological Restoration Fund and community members of the Land Trust, the comprehensive five-year restoration project is well underway—including research areas to document changes.

Creativity and Hard Work Pay Off   Sandplain-Forest-Rock-Point-students-sent-by-teacher-Justin-Gay-March-14-2014-(3)

While historically fire would be used to manage these lands, most Sandplain Forests are surrounded by suburban development making fire restoration work impractical. Instead, in consultation with experts, we created a strategy that substitutes selective tree removal and raking to mimic the positive impacts of fire.

There is already great news. Our active raking and tree thinning restoration work has allowed dormant seeds to come to life and has resulted in the reestablishment of a state-threatened rare plant species.

As a result, this Sandplain Forest is one step closer toward becoming a more vibrant and healthy place for the plants and animals that once flourished there.

Students make progress on mimicking the effects of fire on the forest floor.

Students make progress on mimicking the effects of fire on the forest floor.

 

Sandplain-Raked

The raked forest floor: Without the duff layer on the ground, pitch pine seeds have a better shot at germinating.

Digging In and Making a Difference

Imagine twelve people who normally work in an office getting outside to help slow down flooding along the Upper La Platte River.

Now imagine slogging about in the mud, planting trees, laughing in the sunshine and sitting along the banks having a snack with some of your co-workers. And knowing that you just helped conserve the wildlife habitat and quality of Lake Champlain’s drinking water with each tree you planted.

That’s what a team of employees from 1% for the Planet did this fall.

The trees will help protect riverbanks and prevent storm runoff from entering the La Platte River. The La Platte flows directly into the Shelburne Bay of Lake Champlain, the primary source of drinking water for the greater Burlington area.

The partnership is a perfect fit for the Lake Champlain Land Trust and 1% for the Planet, which connects businesses, consumers, and nonprofits towards the common goal of saving the environment. 1% for the Planet encourages businesses to donate one percent of profits to environmental nonprofit organizations.

Studies show that employees who can participate in community projects as part of the business are more satisfied with their jobs and have a greater sense of team loyalty toward the organization.

“For us at 1% for the Planet, we see the value in not just a one-time volunteer day but partnering with one organization to go deep. We plan to regularly return to this site for our employee volunteer days throughout the year in order to maintain the beautiful trail and continue to build the riverside buffer,” – Jon Cocina, Membership Coordinator for 1% for the Planet.

“It’s so inspiring to work with area businesses who want to give back to the Lake and the lands that surround it,” said Chris Boget, Executive Director of the Lake Champlain Land Trust. “1% for the Planet is helping to lead the way, joining other local businesses who support our land and water conservation efforts.”

Would you like to help out? For more information about volunteering with the Lake Champlain Land Trust, visit our volunteer webpage.

Save the Dates for our Upcoming Events!

Experience the Forest at Night and Call Owls!

Bring your friends and family for a fun-filled, naturalist-led, evening hike as we learn about owls and explore the Upper La Platte River Natural Area in Shelburne, VT. Unplug and enjoy a quiet walk—we may even hear an owl!

What: Full Moon Owl Hoot Hike
Where: Upper La Platte River Natural Area (Shelburne, VT)
When: Friday, March 2, 2018
Time: 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
What to bring/wear: Traction devices for boots or snowshoes are a must. We suggest bringing a headlamp or flashlight.

Please bring weather appropriate clothing as the temperature will drop after dark.
Free but registration is required. This is a very popular event and space is limited. Please RSVP to , or call 802-862-4150 x3.


Eagle Mountain Winter Trek!

Join us as we explore the winter trails of Eagle Mountain Natural Area in Milton, Vermont. We’ll pass through open fields and mature forests on our way to the spectacular Hoyt Lookout on this moderate winter hike.

What: Moderate Hike (2 miles roundtrip)
Where: Eagle Mountain Natural Area – Click here for driving directions.
When: Saturday, January 27, 2018
Time: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
What to bring/wear: Traction devices for boots or snowshoes are a must.  We also suggest bringing a water bottle and camera.

Free but registration is required.
Please RSVP to , or call 802-862-4150 x3.


Slideshow Presentation and Annual Meeting!
Wednesday, October 18th at 7 p.m.

From the 1840s to the 1870s, thousands of travelers arrived in Burlington on large steamships originally docked at the Head of Lake Champlain at the “Lake Station” adjacent to our newest natural area in Whitehall, NY. Today, all four tracks of the former railcar-to-steamship station are long gone, as is the storage building on our Whitehall Cliffs Natural Area.

Join us as Executive Director, Chris Boget, presents a slideshow exploring the unique natural and cultural history of the Head of Lake Champlain, including Whitehall Cliffs Natural Area and the lost “Lake Station” docks. Featuring historic photographs and maps, as well as stunning present day images of the ruins of the Lake Station, the slideshow will illuminate the fascinating history of this scenic landscape. A brief annual meeting with cake will follow the presentation.

When: Wednesday, October 18, 2017 Sponsored by Main Street Landing
Time: 7 p.m.
What: Slideshow presentation, brief annual meeting, and cake
Where: One Main Street, Train Station Lobby, Burlington, VT (detailed directions below)

Note: Ample free parking in Main Street Landing Lot

Detailed Directions: The talk and celebration will be held in the Train Station Lobby (lower level) at One Main Street in Burlington. One Main Street is the large beige brick building with the gargoyles on top and green awnings. It once housed the train station. Simply drive down Main Street, cross Battery Street at the light, and follow the street down to the large open surface parking lot on the left (just north of the One Main Street building).

From the parking lot, you may enter One Main Street from the bike path, where there is a covered entrance with sliding doors. (From Main Street, you enter the upper lobby and walk down the central staircase to the Train Station Lobby below.)

This event is free, but RSVP requested.  

*Photo courtesy of the Historical Society of Whitehall


Law IslandSunset Bike and Conservation Update!

Bring binoculars and your camera for this scenic four-mile roundtrip bike ride on the Colchester Causeway. Learn about Porter Natural Area, Law Island, and our current conservation projects. We’ll bike from Airport Park to a resting place along the Colchester Causeway near Law Island where we’ll enjoy scenic views in all directions. Executive Director Chris Boget will provide an update on our conservation efforts, including several exciting new land protection projects in Vermont and New York.

What: Easy Bike Ride (4 miles roundtrip, mostly flat) and Brief Conservation Update
Where: Airport Park (Meeting Place) Address: 500 Colchester Point Road, Colchester, VT
Click here to create personalized driving directions.
When: Wednesday, July 26, 2017
Time: 6 pm to 8:30 pm
What to bring/wear: Bicycle, water bottle, camera

Free but registration is required.
Please RSVP to , or call 802-862-4150 x3.


Eagle MountainExplore the Other Side of Eagle Mountain!

Join us for a naturalist-led hike through the southern loop trails of Eagle Mountain Natural Area in Milton, Vermont. We’ll walk along mossy ledges, pass through a mature beech forest, and learn about the unique farming and maple sugaring history of this incredible land. On our way back to the trailhead, we’ll stop at the Hoyt Overlook, which provides spectacular views of the Champlain Islands and northern Adirondack Mountains.

What: Moderate Hike (2.5 miles roundtrip)
Where: Eagle Mountain Natural Area – Click here for driving directions.
When: Saturday, July 1, 2017 (Rain or Shine)
Time: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
What to bring/wear: Hiking boots, long pants, water bottle, camera

Free but registration is required.
Please RSVP to , or call 802-862-4150 x3.


Wild About Wildflowers at Butternut Hill!

Bring your camera as we look for spring blossoms at one of the best wildflower viewing sites in the Champlain Valley.  We’ll follow an easy two-mile-long loop trail to the shores of Lake Champlain.

What: Wildflower Hike
Where: Butternut Hill Natural Area (North Hero, VT) – Click here for driving directions.

Click here for information about The Lake Champlain Land Trust’s role in the conservation of Butternut Hill Natural Area.

When: Saturday, May 13, 2017
Time: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
What to bring/wear Waterproof boots, long pants, water bottle, and camera.

Free but registration is required.
Please RSVP to , or call 802-862-4150 x3.


Plant a Tree (or Ten) for Lake Champlain!

Join us on Saturday, November 19th at 10 am for a Tree Planting Workday! We’ll plant native trees along the La Platte River and celebrate this important water quality project with delicious coffee and baked goods from August First Bakery.

What: Upper La Platte River Natural Area Tree Planting
When: Saturday, November 19 (Rain or Shine, Snacks Provided)
10 am to 1 pm
Where: Upper La Platte River Natural Area, 480 Thomas Road, Shelburne, VT
What to Bring: Work gloves, water bottle, shovel (if you have one)
What to Wear: Long pants, sturdy boots, hat

Please RSVP to: , or call 802-862-4150.


Celebrating Five Years of Restoring the
Upper La Platte River Natural Area
!

Please bring your friends and family and join us for a Fall Hike and Annual Celebration at our Upper La Platte River Natural Area in Shelburne on Sunday, October 23rd.

We’ll be talking about our tremendous progress in restoring the important riverbanks of the La Platte River, walking the new connector trail linking the scenic Upper Field Trail to the Hemlock Trail, and offering both an easy and moderate naturalist-guided tour of the trail system.

AGENDA

Water Quality Update: Come see the diverse array of new trees and shrubs (over 1,200 planted and counting!) and learn why restoring our floodplain forests is so important for both protecting our communities and the Lake.

Restored Wildlife Habitats: Find out what animals are now living in and around the La Platte River and view exciting wildlife photos taken this fall at the Natural Area!

Annual Meeting / Celebration: We’ll provide updates on our ongoing and new projects, and we’ll celebrate with apple cider and donuts!

Hike the Trails: We’ll offer two separate naturalist-guided tours—an easy half-mile loop and a moderate two-mile loop.

When: Sunday, October 23, 2016
Time: 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm (Rain or Shine)
What: Project updates, annual meeting, naturalist-guided hikes, and refreshments
What to bring/wear: Hiking boots
Where: Upper La Platte River Natural Area, Shelburne, VT (directions)

Free but space is limited. Preregistration is required.
Please RSVP to  or (802) 862-4150 x3


Plant a Tree (or Ten) for Lake Champlain!

We will be hosting a Tree Planting Workday this November (Date and Time TBD).  We’ll be planting native trees along the La Platte River and learn why restoring our floodplain forests is so important for both protecting our communities and the water quality of Lake Champlain.

Subscribers to our E-news will be the first to be informed about the tree planting date and time….sign up today!


Birds and Bagels at Split Rock Mountain!

Bring your binoculars and your appetite as we look for bald eagles and enjoy a tasty trail snack of fresh local bagels (from Dogwood Bread Company in Wadhams, NY) during a moderate three-mile-hike to a gorgeous Lake Champlain overlook.

What: Hike and Birdwatching
When: Saturday, August 27, 2016 (Rain or Shine),
9 am to 12 noon
Where: Split Rock Mountain Wild Forest
What to Bring: Water bottle, binoculars, snack

NOTE: Due to limited parking, space is limited. RSVP required: , or call 802-862-4150.


Round Pond State Park

Round Pond Restoration Workday!

Join us on Join us as we continue restoring the beautiful woodlands of Round Pond and go for a short hike. If this 2001 conservation success story has been on your list for a while, this is a great excuse to visit!

What: Round Pond Restoration Workday
When: Saturday, July 16, 2016 (Rain or Shine),
9 am to 12 noon
Where: Round Pond State Park, South Hero, VT
(Park at the intersection of East Shore Rd and Landon Rd.)
What to Wear: Long sleeves and pants, sturdy boots, hat
What to Bring: Work gloves, water bottle, shovel (if you have one)

P.S. Registration required. Please register today by email to:  or call 802-862-4150.


how can we clean water, clean water, water quality, water pollution, lake champlain

Plant a Tree (or Ten) for Lake Champlain!

Join us on Monday, May 16th at 10 am for a Tree Planting Workday! We’ll plant native trees along the La Platte River and learn why restoring our floodplain forests is so important for both protecting our communities and the water quality of Lake Champlain. We need your help to restore an entire forest on the conserved Upper La Platte River Natural Area.

What: Upper La Platte River Natural Area Tree Planting
When: Monday, May 16 (Rain or Shine, Snacks Provided)
10 am to 12 noon
Where: Upper La Platte River Natural Area, 480 Thomas Road, Shelburne, VT
What to Bring: Work gloves, water bottle, shovel (if you have one)
What to Wear: Long pants, sturdy boots, hat

Please RSVP to: , or call 802-862-4150.

Round Pond State Park

Join Us for Green Up Day in South Hero!

We are excited to start our volunteer season with a fun Green Up Day event at Round Pond State Park on Saturday, May 7th (details below). Our friends at the South Hero Land Trust coordinate all of the town’s Green Up Day activities. This is our second year leading the Round Pond restoration work. The project will involve removing invasive species such as wild parsnip and honeysuckle.

Note: Space is limited. Registration required. Please let us know if you will be attending as soon as possible, as it will help us plan the day. 

If you can’t make Green Up Day, we have another spring volunteer day planned for mid/late May. We’ll be planting trees at our Upper La Platte River Natural Area in Shelburne. (The date and time for this event will be forthcoming.)

As always, if you have any question feel free to e-mail our Outreach Coordinator Jeff at  or call 802-862-4150.

What: Green Up Day Restoration Project
When: Saturday, May 7th
9 am to 11 am
Where: Round Pond State Park, South Hero, VT
(Park at the intersection of East Shore Rd and Landon Rd.)
What to Wear: Long sleeves and pants, sturdy boots, hat
What to Bring: Work gloves, water bottle, shovel (if you have one)

P.S. Registration required. Please register today by email to:  or call 802-862-4150.


Get outside this spring with the Lake Champlain Land Trust!  We have several fun events planned this spring, including a tree planting workday at our Upper La Platte River Natural Area in Shelburne. Check back for more information, or sign up for our E-newsletter to stay up-to-date on Lake Champlain Land Trust news and events.


Hiking near Burlington VT

Experience the Forest at Night and Call Owls!

Bring your friends and family for a fun-filled, naturalist-led, evening hike in the deep forest as we learn about owls and explore Niquette Bay State Park. Unplug and enjoy a quiet walk in the woods—we may even hear an owl!

What: Evening Owl Hoot Hike
Where: Niquette Bay State Park (Colchester, VT)

Click here for information about The Lake Champlain Land Trust’s role in the conservation of Niquette Bay State Park.

When: Friday, February 26th
Time: 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
What to bring/wear: Traction devices for boots or snowshoes are a must on the well-used winter trails of Niquette. We suggest bringing a headlamp or flashlight.

Please bring weather appropriate clothing as the temperature will drop after dark.
Free but registration is required. This is a very popular event and space is limited. Please RSVP to , or call 802-862-4150 x3.


Eagle Mountain Winter

Get outside this winter with the Lake Champlain Land Trust!  We have several events planned, including a snowshoe hike at Eagle Mountain and the always-popular annual Owl Hoot at Niquette Bay State Park.  We’re also teaming up with the organizers of North Hero’s Great Ice! to help put on this exciting multi-day festival featuring ice skating, dog-sled rides, pickup hockey, and treks across the frozen Lake (February 3rd UPDATE: Great Ice! has been cancelled due to indequate ice and snow — See http://greaticevt.org/ for details).

Check back for more information, or sign up for our E-newsletter to stay up-to-date on Lake Champlain Land Trust news and events.


 

Tree Planting


 

Paddling Presentation and Annual Meeting!
Wednesday, October 28th at 7 p.m.

Join the authors of the new book A Paddler’s Guide to the Champlain Valley—former trustee Cathy Frank and friend Margy Holden—as they share a slide show of their epic journey through the Champlain Valley’s beautiful waterways!  They will share their behind-the-scenes stories, humorous adventures, and stunning pictures.

The book expands on their regional bestseller A Kayaker’s Guide to Lake Champlain, and includes popular river trips, as well as lesser-known paddles through wetlands, creeks, and secluded streams. A brief annual meeting and book signing (with cake!) will follow the presentation.

When: Wednesday, October 28, 2015 Sponsored by Main Street Landing
Time: 7 p.m.
What: Paddling presentation, brief annual meeting, and cake
Where: One Main Street, Train Station Lobby, Burlington, VT (detailed directions below)

Note: Ample free parking in Main Street Landing Lot

Detailed Directions: The talk and celebration will be held in the Train Station Lobby (lower level) at One Main Street in Burlington. One Main Street is the large beige brick building with the gargoyles on top and new green awnings. It once housed the train station. Simply drive down Main Street, cross Battery Street at the light, and follow the street down to the large open surface parking lot on the left (just north of the One Main Street building).

From the parking lot, you may enter One Main Street from the bike path, where there is a covered entrance with sliding doors. (From Main Street, you enter the upper lobby and walk down the central staircase to the Train Station Lobby below.)

This event is free, but RSVP required.  


 

Bring your friends and family and join us for a habitat restoration workday at our Eagle Mountain Natural Area in Milton!

Spend a few hours helping to improve the habitat and trails in the areas near the spring brush fire zone and learn why forest restoration work is so important for supporting native plant species, improving wildlife habitat, and protecting the Lake.  After our work is done, we’ll head to the Hoyt Overlook for a great view of the Lake!

When: Saturday, September 12, 2015
Time: 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
What to bring/wear: Work gloves, long pants, boots, plenty of water, and, if you have them, large pruners and/or a small hacksaw.
Location: Eagle Mountain Natural Area, Milton (directions)

Free.  Please RSVP to help us plan the day. 


 

RSVP to the workshop on Protecting Lake Champlain!

Screened Houses Malletts Bay What:  We’re teaming up with the Lake Champlain Sea Grant Program and Friends of Northern Lake Champlain to host a hands-on lake protection workshop for property owners on Lake Champlain’s shores. The workshop will outline what shoreland owners need to know about the 2014 Shoreland Protection regulations and how they can go beyond these requirements to protect the Lake’s water quality and important wildlife habitat. Regional experts on land use and lake science, including a representative from the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), will be on hand to answer your questions.

When: Friday, July 17, 2015
Time: 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Where: Camp Randolph Clubhouse, Highgate, VT (click here for directions)

Free. RSVP Required. Click here to RSVP.


 

Tree Planting in Shelburne Tuesday, May 19th!

Please bring your friends and family and join us for a Tree Planting Workday at our Upper La Platte River Natural Area in Shelburne.

Spend an hour or three planting native trees along the edges of the La Platte River and learn why restoring our floodplain forests is so important for both protecting our communities and the lake.  After planting, we’ll provide updates on our ongoing and new projects!

When: Tuesday, May 19, 2015
Time: 9:00 am – 12:30 pm
What: Tree restoration planting and updates on our programs.
What to bring/wear: A shovel, gloves, long pants, boots, and your enthusiasm
Where: Upper La Platte River Natural Area, Shelburne (directions)

Free.  Please RSVP to help us plan the day. 

A special thank you to our partners Mike Ingalls of the Intervale Conservation Nursery, Becky Tharp of the Lake Champlain Sea Grant, and the State of Vermont Ecosystem Restoration Program.


Hike One of our Wildflower Trails!

White Trillium at Eagle Moutain

Celebrate Mother’s Day or a college graduation by hiking through our preserves dotted with spring wildflowers.

The recent “summer” weather has been perfect for native wildflowers. Bring your family and friends to one of our many conserved areas to see wildflowers peaking during this beautiful time of year.

Four Suggested Wildflower Hikes on Lake Champlain Land Trust Conserved Lands

  • Eagle Mountain (Milton). This beautiful short loop includes wildflowers (Mountaintop Trail) and a spectacular vista over the lake (Hoyt Lookout Trail).
  • Niquette Bay State Park (Colchester). This easy hike follows wildflower-rich areas down to a sandy beach.
  • Butternut Hill / Camp Ingalls (North Hero). A mile-long flat trail to Lake Champlain, but some of the thickest displays of wildflowers in the Champlain Valley are within 500 feet of the parking area.
  • Landon Community Trail (South Hero). A short and easy hike full of wildflowers and scenic vistas.

Click the links above for directions for these areas and others!

For more information about these hikes, call us at 802-862-4150 or e-mail .

Red flower_Wildflowers Niquette May09 CPO (32) 6Bloodroot_Round Pond Wildflower Hunt 2 5Hepatica at Eagle Mountain


Join us for Green Up Day, Saturday May 2nd!

zencen posion parship shovelInvasive Plant Removal:  We’re teaming up with our friends at the South Hero Land Trust to help prevent the spread of invasive Wild Parsnip at Round Pond State Park.  Meet our staff naturalist at 8:45 a.m. at the corner of  Landon & East Shore Roads in South Hero.  Please bring your own shovel.  Afterwards, join us from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for a Green Up Day BBQ at the Folsom School Playground featuring free burgers, hot dogs, and ice cream!

No RSVP necessary. For more information, call Jeff at 802-862-4150, ext. 2 or e-mail .


 

Owl Hoot

Our thanks to Vermont Public Radio’s Vermont Edition (host Jane Lindholm and hiker/producer Ric Cengeri) who recently included our successful 2015 Owl Hoot on the March 25, 2015 episode of the Vermont Edition. (Listen to the Owl segment here.)

If you are interested in attending a future naturalist-led event on one of our conservation projects, send your postal address or email to chris@lclt.org and we will invite you to upcoming hikes.

Large Barred Owl close up in snow

Lake Champlain Photos – Chris Boget

Fog-on-the-lake-view-of-Adirondacks-Chris-Boget-2014

Fog on the lake from the wacky weather obscures all but the high peaks of the Adirondacks

Lake Champlain Photos – Kim Mihan

View of Camel's Hump from Charlotte_Kim Mihan_2014_web2

View of Camel’s Hump from Charlotte. Photo by Kim Mihan

Lake Champlain Photos – Kim Mihan

View-of-Mount-Mansfield-from-Niquette_-Kim-Mihan_2014-Web

View of Mount Mansfield from Niquette Bay State Park. Photo by Kim Mihan

Lake Champlain Land Trust Earns National Recognition

The Lake Champlain Land Trust has achieved renewed accreditation from the Land Trust Accreditation Commission, an independent commission of land conservation experts.LTAC_seal_green--web

In 2007 the Lake Champlain Land Trust was nationally recognized as the first land trust in Vermont and one of the first seventeen nationwide, to be officially accredited by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission. The land trust accreditation program recognizes land conservation organizations that meet national quality standards for protecting important natural places and working lands forever.

“This designation assures all of our supporters and local landowners, who generously protect their land for the benefit of all of us, that the Lake Champlain Land Trust is meeting or exceeding national conservation standards for excellence,” said Chris Boget, Executive Director.

“The accreditation seal lets the public know that the accredited land trust has undergone an extensive, external review of the governance and management of its organization and the systems and policies it uses to protect land.” – Tammara Van Ryn, Commission Executive Director

The Lake Champlain Land Trust was awarded renewal in August and is now one of only 280 land trusts from across the country that are now accredited. Accreditation renewal must be completed every five years and provides the public with an assurance that the Lake Champlain Land Trust continues to meet exceedingly high standards for quality.

“We are proud to have been one of the first land trusts in the country to achieve accreditation and we strive to maintain that excellence in our work every day.” -Chris Boget, Executive Director

Caring for Our Land

Volunteer Spotlight: Baird Morgan

Baird Morgan looking over Lake Champlain from Hoyt Overlook

Baird Morgan looking over Lake Champlain from Hoyt Overlook

Baird Morgan has a clear view of Eagle Mountain from his Grand Isle camp and was one of the many volunteers who answered our request to adopt one of our trails. He, along with many Adopt-A-Trail volunteers, have been visiting “their” trail a couple of times a month to both enjoy the views and to make sure that the trails are clear of tree branches and litter.

After adding fresh blazes from the new parking area, and recruiting fellow hikers like his wife, and even a stranger he met on the trail, Baird worked with the Lake Champlain Land Trust to come up with new trail signs. Baird even successfully convinced the publisher of the local Milton Independent to write a story to help recruit other volunteers.  (Suzanne Flynn, the owner of the Milton Independent and several local newspapers generously paid for the new signs.)

“As a busy land trust, we rely on people like Baird to help us take care of these special community places,” noted Chris Boget,  Executive Director of the Lake Champlain Land Trust. “I am grateful for how far he went to make sure the trail improvements made it easier for everyone to enjoy Eagle Mountain.”

Working with Baird, the Lake Champlain Land Trust can bring in additional volunteers if there is ever the need for substantial clean-up or removal of blown-down trees. A special thank you to Baird for all of his help and being one of the official “eyes on the ground” team members of the Lake Champlain Land Trust.

You know, I really enjoy it. I love being outside in different seasons and I appreciate knowing that I can help out in my own small way. It doesn’t take a ton of time, it’s not hard and it’s fun.”  -Baird Morgan, Volunteer

 

Do you or your family want to adopt a trail near you, or are you interested in joining our volunteer email list to learn about upcoming project needs? Give us a call (802) 862-4150 or email jeff@lclt.org.